Visualize Large Complex Data with Local Tile Layers in Bing Maps Windows Store Apps (C#)

Tile Layers are a creative way to visualize large complex data. By visualizing data as an image the map control only needs to reposition a set of images rather than every single data point of the data. This greatly improves performance and often reduces the amount of data the user will have to download. Tile layers generally consist of a large number of images that have a specific naming convention and are hosted online. Every once and a while I...
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Bing Spatial Data Services Meets 3D

At //build 2014 there were many exciting announcements. It would have been easy to miss one of the implications of the moment of glory for Internet Explorer 11 during the keynote on day 1. The demo of the new FishGL website gave a hint about the enhanced support for WebGL in IE11 and, while I find fish quite yummy, I was more intrigued about what it means for mapping. After installing the Windows 8.1 Update, I quickly checked on Cesium, a free and...
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Staying Fit with Bing Maps

I just feel better when I have a certain level of fitness. So, I came up with the idea of the ‘Donkey Bike’. The idea was to create a virtual trip to visit my parents in Germany and track the progress with every rotation of my wheel and every stroke of the rower. I’d rather choose a scenic route than the direct one, so the first part of the journey is a 6,886 km ride from Redmond, WA to Nova Scotia, Canada. With 1,081 km down, a flat tire (yes...
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Image Overlays with Bing Maps (Native)

A while back I wrote a blog posts called Image Overlays with Bing Maps (JavaScript). In this blog post we saw a couple of different ways to overlay an image on the map and bind it to a bounding box such that it stays correctly positioned when panned and scales as you zoom the map. In this blog post we are going to look at two different methods for doing this in the Native Bing Maps SDK for Window Store Apps. The first method will consist of...
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Geo-fencing with Bing Spatial Data Services and Azure Mobile Services

Triggering certain actions such as sending notifications or alerts when a device enters or leaves an area is often referred to as geo-fencing. The geo-fence, the boundary of the area of interest, can be dynamic like a radius around a school or around your own device, it can be pre-defined such as a neighborhood, city or county, or it can be an area defined and digitized for a specific purpose. In this post, we will walk through an end-to-end...
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How to Create a Customer Ranked Auto Suggest with Bing Maps and Azure Mobile Services

From time to time I come across developers who want to have an auto suggest search box to use with their map. Your first thought might be to simply use the Bing Maps geocoding services to do this, however this often ends up generating a large number of transactions. If you are using Bing Maps under the free terms of use this can result in your application quickly exceeding the free usage limits. If you have an enterprise license for Bing Maps...
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How to Create Custom Shapes in Windows Store Apps (C#)

In the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps there are five main types of data that you can add to the map: Pushpin, MapPolyline, MapPolygon, MapTileLayer, and UIElements. UIElements can be added to the map just like pushpins and are a great way to create custom shapes to the map.  In this blog post we will see how we can make use of the ability to add a UIElement to the map to create custom shapes that have a lot more customization options...
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Learn How to Create Heat Maps in Native Windows Store Apps

Find out how I came up with a solution for creating heat maps in native Windows Store apps and document the reusable library that I created. Heat maps, also known as density maps, are a type of overlay on a map used to represent data using different colors. They are often used to show the data hot spots on a map. If you are working in JavaScript there is a client-side heat map module available in the Bing Maps V7 Modules project, which can be used...
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Make Clickable Shapes in the Native Bing Maps Control

The native Bing Maps Windows Store control has two types of shapes: polygons and polylines. These shapes are great for representing areas and paths on the map. Often it is useful to be able to associate some information or metadata with these shapes. In past versions of Bing Maps we could easily store this information in the Tag property of the shape. This makes it easy to retrieve this data when a shape is clicked or tapped. Unfortunately,the...
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How to Fine-tune Location Coordinates with the Custom Geocoding Refinement Tool

When presenting custom location data in Bing Maps applications, a frequent requirement is to geocode the addresses of your location data prior to presenting them on the map, ensuring that you have latitude and longitude coordinates that accurately reflect the real-world locations. Bing Maps offers batch geocoding capabilities via the Bing Spatial Data Services Geocode Dataflow API, and also via the Bing Maps Account Center, enabling data sources...
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